Britain threatens to impose controversial steel tariffs on more U.S. goods


If Washington does not abolish the Trump-era tariffs on British steel and aluminum, Britain threatens to impose punitive tariffs on American goods.

British Trade Secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan told U.S. Trade Representative Catherine Tay and U.S. Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo that London is preparing to increase existing retaliatory tariffs on well-known American products including whiskey, cosmetics and clothing.

While visiting Washington, Trevelyan told U.S. officials that if the administration of U.S. President Joe Biden refuses to cancel the measures implemented by her predecessor, Donald Trump, she is still considering the impact of expansion. The scope of punitive tariffs on American products. .

In a public consultation held last year, the United Kingdom indicated that it could target lobster, grapes, chocolate, orange juice and electric motors imported from the United States.

“We don’t want to use countervailing measures, but we are under a lot of pressure at home to say it is unfair,” said a senior British official, referring to the U.S. tariffs imposed on British steel and aluminum imports in 2018.

Britain is isolated after the U.S. and the EU Agree to suspend Tariffs were imposed on steel and aluminum in October. This agreement exempts EU manufacturers from the Trump-era tariffs of 25% on steel and 10% on aluminum, but it puts British steelmakers at a disadvantage because they still face high tariffs on US exports.

Financial Times Report Last week, the United States postponed an agreement to remove tariffs on British steel and aluminum due to Washington’s fears that London would threaten to change Northern Ireland’s post-Brexit trade rules.

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Brussels and Washington have repeatedly warned British Prime Minister Boris Johnson that unilateral changes to the EU-UK agreement may threaten peace on the island of Ireland.

This issue has attracted the attention of a large number of Irish expatriates in the United States Congress, who have repeatedly called on the United Kingdom to abide by the 1998 Good Friday Agreement that ended the three-year conflict in the region.

As part of the visit, Trevelyan met with Richard Neal, the top Democrat on Trade Affairs in the House of Representatives and a member of the “Friends of Ireland” caucus of Congress.

Neal said in a statement after the meeting that he emphasized his full support for the Good Friday Agreement and expressed his “interest in deepening bilateral trade and investment relations with the United Kingdom.”

After the Biden administration made it clear that a trade agreement was not a legislative priority, hopes for a post-Brexit free trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the United States became bleak because it focused on the domestic economic agenda.

However, progress has been made in a long-running dispute. In June of this year, the United States reached an agreement with the United Kingdom and the European Union to suspend tariffs on each other’s goods for five years on subsidies to aircraft manufacturers Boeing and Airbus.



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