When, where, and how to see an annular solar eclipse on June 10


Just two weeks after the total lunar eclipse, another celestial event appeared on the horizon-this time involving the sun.

On Thursday, parts of the northern hemisphere-including Canada-will experience an annular solar eclipse in which most of the sun is blocked by the moon.

There are three main types of solar eclipses: total eclipses, partial eclipses and annular eclipses. During a total solar eclipse, the entire disk of the sun is covered by the moon. Partial eclipses are places where the moon seems to oscillate through some of the sun.

However, an annular solar eclipse means that the moon is a little farther away from us in its orbit and covers everything except the outer edge of the sun, forming some so-called “rings of fire.”

The reason we get these types of solar eclipses is a strange coincidence in nature: the sun is 400 times larger than the moon-but the moon is also close to us 400 times. Every once in a while, the moon can completely cover the face of the sun. Occasionally, when it is at apogee or furthest from the Earth in its monthly orbit, it rarely does this.

This map records the time of the largest solar eclipse in a Canadian city. (Canadian Space Agency)

Although the solar eclipse is beautiful, never look directly at the sun during these events-even if only part of it is covered, because it can cause serious eye damage.

Instead, make sure you have adequate eye protection, Such as eclipse glasses, You may have picked it up during the 2017 solar eclipse. Check them for scratches or holes, and if so, throw them away. Even the slightest blemish can damage your eyes.

Watch | How to watch a solar eclipse safely

A solar eclipse can seriously damage your eyes. Using solar eclipse glasses is just one of the safety tips for watching a total eclipse. 4:36

If you don’t have eclipse glasses, you can make a pinhole projector. Poke a hole in the paper or card, stretch it over your arm with your back facing the sun, and project it onto the ground or another card about a meter away.

time and place

Just like the recent lunar eclipse on May 26, if you want to see this lunar eclipse, you need to wake up very early.

The annular part of the eclipse will be visible in northern Ontario at sunrise, passing through Hudson Bay and into northern Quebec and the Arctic.

This photo from May 20, 2012 shows a deep partial solar eclipse seen from the southwestern United States as the sun sets. The upcoming annular solar eclipse looks similar in many parts of Canada-but this time it is sunrise. (Evan Zach/Sky and Telescope)

However, if you are not in these areas, you can still see a partial solar eclipse at sunrise. The best place to experience the activity will be where the horizon can be clearly seen when the sun rises.

The following are the solar eclipse times of some major cities in Canada, starting from sunrise (all local time):

  • Yellowknife Town: 3:44 am (partial).The largest solar eclipse is at 4:25 am; part of it ends at 5:22 am
  • Iqaluit: 2:18 am (partial start). The largest solar eclipse (circular) is at 6:08 in the morning; the part ends at 7:13 in the morning
  • Inuvik: 3:46 am (partial).The largest solar eclipse is at 4:42 am; the part ends at 5:39 am
  • Vancouver: Invisible
  • Edmonton/Calgary: Invisible
  • Regina/Saskatoon: 4:47 AM (partial).The largest solar eclipse is at 4:51 am; part of it ends at 5 am
  • Winnipeg: 5:20 am (partial).The largest solar eclipse is at 5:24 am; the part ends at 5:55 am
  • Toronto: 5:35 am (partial). The largest solar eclipse is at 5:40 in the morning; the part ends at 6:37 in the morning
  • Ottawa: 5:15 am (partial). The largest solar eclipse is at 5:40 in the morning; the part ends at 6:40 in the morning
  • Montreal: 5:05 am (partial).The largest solar eclipse is at 5:40 am; the part ends at 5:39 am
  • Fredericton: 5:21 am (partial). The largest solar eclipse is at 6:36 in the morning; the part ends at 7:38 in the morning
  • Charlottetown: 5:20 am (partial). The largest solar eclipse is at 6:35 in the morning; the part ends at 7:38 in the morning
  • Halifax: 5:28 am (partial). The largest solar eclipse is at 6:33 in the morning; the part ends at 7:35 in the morning
  • St. John: 5:03 am (partial). The largest solar eclipse is at 7:05 in the morning; the part ends at 8:10 am

If your area happens to have clouds, you can also watch the solar eclipse online in the following ways Virtual telescope project. If you wish to take some pictures, please use this guide to learn how to take pictures safely Sky and telescope.



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