10 Wednesday morning reading-big picture


Welcome to December (how to That happen? ) Let’s start, we read this morning:

Move here, GE.The technology group is the new leader in the industryAs General Electric and other old-school giants fall apart, Amazon, Apple, Alphabet, Microsoft, and Meta are replacing them as the all-round companies of the future (Wall Street Journal)

Inflation bond betting team is temporary Inflation-protected securities has a story about price increases. It is not a panic circulating in politics and news reports. (Bloomberg)

The debt-driven investment strategy survived the pandemic, and then some: The stock may rise, but the promoters of the private plan are still committed to reducing risks. (That is)

College football is crazyIn two days, the head coaches of the two largest college football programs in the United States changed jobs and were sought after by greater challenges and a $100 million contract. (Aksios)

Who is Jack Dorsey? Jack Dorsey portrayed himself as a Randian hero, and the great resignation was Atlas shrugged. (Financial Times)

Can roads charge electric cars?Technology may be closeBut challenges are still waiting, including technical issues, regulatory obstacles and miles of highways. (New York Times)

Intense debate among social scientists about loss aversion Experts believe that explaining the principles of decision-making—from investor behavior to insurance markets—is not ironclad. (dark)

There is technical support behind every hero or villain: The manga often uses cutting-edge technology, and is used by the right-hand man called “the guy on the chair”. But they are not always men, nor are they always helping heroes. (New York Times)

A suitcase-sized neutrino detector hits the dirt of the Large Hadron Collider. Particle physics is hardly the content of cocktail party chat. Unless you attend the International Symposium on Physics; discussions of neutrinos, their masses, their types, and their origins are still as puzzling to the public as cosmology before the Big Bang. But neutrinos may be crucial to tracking the elusive hidden reality of strange dark matter. And this new test is a step in this direction. (Forbes)

Rob McElhenney is always sunny The FXX series “Philadelphia is always sunny” is about to become the longest live-action sitcom in American history. Its energetic stars and creators want to know what will happen next. (New York Times)

Be sure to check our Master of Business Meet with Steven Fradkin, president of Northern Trust Wealth Management, a division of the insurance giant, this weekend. The group manages $355 billion in assets and serves one-fifth of the wealthiest households in the United States. Fradkin served as Chief Financial Officer and Head of NT International Business.

The most lucrative profit since 1950 debunks the CEO’s salary inflation story

source: Bloomberg

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