Medical insurance for workers at the Strike West Virginia Hospital was cut


A union said that repair and service workers who went on strike at a hospital in West Virginia have stopped providing medical insurance.

Approximately 1,000 members of the International Service Employees Union District in 1999 went on strike at Carbell Huntington Hospital last week after their contract expired.

According to The Herald-Dispatch, the director of union organization Sherri McKinney said in a statement that the report was cut off without informing the striking employees and union retirees.

Molly Frick, the hospital’s director of human resources, said in a statement, “The union leadership is well aware that the strike will result in a cessation of wages and benefits. Any employee who wishes to return to work will restore all benefits, including medical insurance.”

A Kabel County judge issued a preliminary injunction on Wednesday, which was requested by the hospital and prohibits the union from carrying out certain activities outside the hospital.

Flick said these activities include loud noises, including the use of loudspeakers and loud music, which can disturb the patients in the hospital. It also prohibits strikers from honking their horns and encourages drivers to honour their horns, obstruct hospital entrances, interfere with hospital traffic, or make threatening remarks to anyone trying to enter or exit the hospital campus.

Circuit Judge Alfred Ferguson (Alfred Ferguson) said that anyone who violates the order could be seen as contempt of court.
The hospital’s recent proposals include an increase in average annual salary of 3%, an increase in shift differences, an increase in uniform allowances, and the continuation of automatic annual contributions to the retirement accounts of eligible employees.

Service personnel are also required to start paying health insurance premiums. According to the latest proposal of the hospital, it will provide more than 90% of the medical care costs for employees and their families.



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