FirstFT: Johnson plans to raise the tax burden to the highest level in 70 years


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Boris Johnson will challenge the rebellious Conservative MP Vote down His declaration £12 billion tax increase plan Funding today’s medical and social care, because he pushed the tax burden in the UK to the highest level since 1950.

The British Prime Minister will ask MPs to support a strategy that breaks the tradition of the Conservative Party claiming to be a low-tax party. A Conservative rebel said that he expected only a “few people” to rebel against Johnson.

Johnson’s plan would transfer his party to the territory of the Labor Party. “We are the party of the NHS,” he announced yesterday. The social care reform proposal will limit people’s costs and protect their assets: This is how they work.

However, the broker described the plan to increase the company’s dividend payment tax as “Gritted teeth“To savers and shareholders.

Helen Thomas argues that, ironically, complexity is part of the attractiveness of national insurance as a tax: it’s hard to see Who ultimately pays.

What do you think of Johnson’s tax increase plan?Let me know [email protected]Thanks for reading FirstFT Europe/Africa — Jennifer

There are five more stories in the news

1. The Taliban form a caretaker government Islamic groups The first caretaker government was established Since Afghanistan came to power last month, it has included several members of the United Nations who have imposed sanctions on terrorism and an interior minister on the FBI’s most wanted list.The Biden administration calls on the U.S. Congress Allow more than 30 billion U.S. dollars Provide assistance and relief to Afghan refugees.

  • deeper: Germany has become the most prominent European country calling dialogue With Islamic radicals.

  • View: The global war on terror concealed the fact that 9/11 was born out of successive jihad failures. David Gardner wrote.

2. El Salvador’s Bitcoin debut stumbles The country is the first to adopt Bitcoin as legal tender Hit obstacles in hours It was launched yesterday after the government had to use its application for storing unstable digital assets to be temporarily offline and global prices plummeted. Is El Salvador too hasty to adopt Bitcoin? Vote in our poll.

3. Apple executives’ accusations against Ford Doug Field, the executive responsible for Apple’s secret car project Leave ford Withdrawal, this may mean the end of the iPhone manufacturer’s automotive ambitions.

4. Mexico’s Supreme Court voted to legalize abortion Supreme Court Unanimous ruling Yesterday’s legalization of abortion was a victory for women’s rights activists, in stark contrast to the increasing number of abortions Practical limitations Cross the U.S. border.

Mexican women protest to support legal abortion

Women protesting in support of legal abortion in Mexico, where the procedure is difficult to obtain © Reuters

5. Kane Energy is close to India’s tax settlement BP said it expects Return “up to 700 million US dollars” to investors Because it shows that it is about to resolve a long-standing tax dispute with New Delhi.

Coronavirus Digest

  • this Biden The government’s plan to widely implement the coronavirus booster injection later this month has become Into chaos.

  • There may be a narrower product range and fewer discounts during the period Christmas As it is related to the pandemic Supply chain bottlenecks.

  • Chief Executive Officer of Pfizer Albert Bourla says there are now enough jabs to meet the World Health Organization’s goals Increase fair distribution. The company’s top scientist Philip Dormitzer denied that a more effective jab should be developed to avoid “Breakthrough infection“.

  • View: The vaccine passport conflicts with the British vision of their relationship with the country. Written by Sebastian Payne.

Bar graph showing global dose per capita supply agreement (all vaccines)

follow Our live report with Sign up For us Coronavirus business update Regularly report how the pandemic affects the economy.

the day before

French terrorism trial A landmark trial of 20 men accused of planning and perpetrating the 2015 Paris terrorist attack, which killed 130 people and injured hundreds Nowadays.

U.S. Federal Reserve Beige Book freed The central bank will Published Beige Book, A qualitative report on the state of the economy will help inform the Fed’s decision to start cutting its $120 billion monthly government debt purchases.New York Fed President John Williams was also due to say Study monetary policy and economic prospects at St. Lawrence University. (“Financial Times”, “Wall Street Journal”)

The opening debate of the Elizabeth Holmes trial The founder and CEO of Theranos will Facing charges of fraudulent patients and investors Regarding the technology her company used to conduct blood tests at the beginning of her trial. (Wall Street Journal)

Other content we are reading and listening

Libya’s neighbors still feel Muammar Gaddafi’s death For a long time, Libya has been an entrepot for immigrants from the north.But after the 2011 revolution that overthrew the dictator, their numbers skyrocketed and were full of stories of brutality and abuse Common.

Living in the shadow of 9/11 When the Twin Towers collapsed on September 11, 2001, Brendan Greeley escaped. He was 26 years old that year. He is 46 years old now. This is his story.

“I told myself that what happened every year was not so important to me. Then last month, the rest of the family fell asleep, and I started to think about the details.”

Brendan Greeley:

Brendan Greeley: “I was sitting alone in the basement crying, uncontrollably undulating in the waves for about an hour” ©Shonagh Rae

Silicon Valley billionaires want to be young forever Why not try to delay death by cracking the aging process?This is the prospect behind Advanced laboratory, A company that poached some of the most famous scientists in the field of aging. According to reports, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos (Jeff Bezos) is one of the supporters.

China’s strict gaming restrictions The risks of addiction, over-consumption and over-indulgence have caused video games to be called “poisons”, “drugs” and “mental opium” by state-controlled newspapers.But last month Beijing imposed The strictest restrictions in the world In such games, it reflects people’s growing concerns about the influence of Chinese technology giants.

Claire Barrett’s financial clinic In this episode of the podcast, Claer Barrett of FT Interview with Joe Lesser, Consumer activist and comedian.As a new season of his award-winning TV show Joe Lycett supports you Back on Channel 4, he walked into the FT studio and told us his real thoughts on the financial world.

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U.S. GQ special writer Rachel Seville Tashjian’s extensive use of caps locks and exclamation points Gorgeous tips for invitation-only newsletters From the tasteful pleasures of lunch to quirky interviews with leather slippers obsessives??, letters about everything are sent every week.

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