China warns of U.S. tensions threatening to tackle climate change


Climate change update

China warned the United States that its “strategic misjudgment” has exacerbated bilateral tensions and could disrupt high-level talks aimed at addressing the threat of global climate change.

The climate envoys of the world’s two largest economies, John Kerry and Xie Zhenhua, are meeting in Tianjin in northeastern China. The Biden government called on the Xi Jinping government to increase its efforts to reduce carbon emissions.

Meeting between Biggest polluter happened at Increase strain The United States and China are arguing about Beijing’s suppression of democratic movements in Hong Kong, Taiwan, Xinjiang, and the South China Sea, as well as technology and the origin of the coronavirus.

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi spoke with Kerry via a video link on Wednesday and warned that cooperation will not continue without a better relationship.

According to Chinese official media reports, Wang added that “the major strategic misjudgment of the United States has led to the sudden deterioration of bilateral relations in recent years” and that “the ball is now in the US court”.

However, Kerry stated that the United States is “still committed to cooperating with the world to tackle the climate crisis” and “encourage [People’s Republic of China] Take additional measures to reduce emissions,” a State Council spokesperson said.

Since Joe Biden became president, relations between the two countries have been difficult, with few high-level meetings. At the end of July, during talks between China’s Deputy Foreign Minister Xie Feng and US Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman, China stated that the relationship between the two countries was at a dangerous “stalemate”.

But people have always hoped that climate change may provide opportunities to improve relationships.

The Garrigues meeting was held after discussions in Shanghai in April, which led to a joint statement highlighting the commitment to “specific actions in the 2020s” to reduce emissions in accordance with the 2015 Paris Agreement targets. According to the agreement, countries have vowed to limit global warming to “far below” 2C, preferably around 1.5C, compared to pre-industrial levels.

Li Shuo, an energy policy officer for the campaign organization Greenpeace, pointed out that the Shanghai meeting covered most of the “unresolved fruits” before more substantive negotiations aimed at reaching an agreement on recent emissions reductions.

“Tianjin is more difficult in many aspects, not just bilateral relations, but further advancement in climate requires the courage of both parties,” Li said.

Glasgow will host the COP26 United Nations Climate Conference next month, and countries are expected to pass more ambitious climate goals at the meeting.

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Beijing is trying to position itself as a global leader in tackling climate change, and Xi Jinping last year pledged to achieve net zero carbon dioxide emissions by 2060.

But China has been under pressure to advance its peak emissions target from 2030 to the middle of this decade. Critics say the continued dependence of the Chinese economy on the coal-fired power industry may undermine its promises.

“I believe Kerry will promote China’s ambitions, including [emissions] Peak before 2025 and reduce coal at home and along the Belt and Road,” Li said, referring to Xi Jinping’s ambitious transnational infrastructure investment projects. “But I doubt that when Kerry is here, China will immediately make Response. “



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