Amnesty seeks suspension of surveillance technology | Human Rights News


Human rights organizations warned of the “destructive impact of the poorly regulated spyware industry on global human rights.”

Refer to The government uses mobile phone malware Amnesty International stated that the equipment provided by an Israeli company to monitor journalists, activists and heads of state “exposed the global human rights crisis” and requested that the sale and use of surveillance technology be suspended.

In a statement on Friday, the non-governmental organization warned of the “destructive impact of the poorly regulated spyware industry on global human rights.”

NSO Group’s Pegasus software — capable of turning on the phone’s camera or microphone and collecting its data — was at the center of the storm after a list of approximately 50,000 potential surveillance targets was leaked to rights groups.

Amnesty International and Forbidden Stories, a French media non-profit organization, collaborated with several media companies, including The Washington Post, The Guardian and Le Monde, to analyze and publish the list.

President of France Emmanuel Macron, Who is on the so-called target list, had to change his phone and number.

Amnesty International Secretary-General Agnes Karamad said in a statement: “This not only exposes the risks and injuries of individuals who are illegally targeted, but also has extremely unstable consequences for global human rights and the security of the entire digital environment. .

The National Bureau of Statistics of Israel is “just a company.”

She said: “This is a dangerous industry that has been operating on the fringe of legality for too long and cannot continue.”

“Now, we urgently need to implement stricter supervision of the network surveillance industry, accountability for violations and violations of human rights, and stricter supervision of this shady industry.”

Amnesty calls for an immediate suspension of the export, sale, transfer and use of any surveillance technology “until a regulatory framework that complies with human rights is in place.”

“In fact, the world and other political leaders themselves may have entered the crosshairs of spyware technology, which is expected to be a wake-up call for them and other countries in the world to strengthen and regulate this industry,” Karamad said.

The list of accused targets includes at least 180 journalists, 600 politicians, 85 human rights activists and 65 business leaders.

NSO insists that its software is only used to combat terrorism and other criminal activities and has been approved by the Israeli government for export to 45 countries.





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