State legislators discuss mandatory COVID-19 vaccination for all public officials

Sacramento, California (Krona) – A Democratic California senator is pushing for all public officials to be vaccinated.

During the coronavirus outbreak, lawmakers returned to the State Capitol on Monday, and the virus has infected both vaccinated and unvaccinated people.

“We have a responsibility to the public to take public health precautions for ourselves and our colleagues, and to protect the public,” said Senator Scott Wiener, a Democratic Senator from San Francisco.

Wiener called on all public officials, including elected officials, to be vaccinated.

“Whether we are elected officials or legislators. Whether we are firefighters or policemen, or work in DMV or homeless outreach workers, we are all interacting with the public. We also keep the government open, operational and operational. ,” Wiener explained.

The push was carried out when nine state capitol employees and assembly staff tested positive for COVID-19 in about a week.

The latest memo sent over the weekend stated that two people who have recently tested positive have been vaccinated and are wearing masks.

“I think they are recovering, as we have seen in many people,” said Senator Melissa Melendez of Lake Elsinore.

Melendez weighed in on pushing public officials to vaccinate on Monday.

“I always think that vaccination is a personal choice. I understand those who are very afraid of contracting this virus. In fact, they prefer that everyone be vaccinated, whether it is a public employee or a private employee, but this is unreasonable,” Mellen Des said.

Although the strain of the coronavirus in the State Capitol case is not yet known, in efforts to contain the epidemic, California’s main strain is the infectious delta variant.

The state’s positive rate has risen slightly, reaching 1.5% as of Monday. State data show that approximately 60% of California’s population is fully vaccinated.

Currently, state lawmakers have stated that they have no plans to push for legislation to compel public officials to vaccinate, but Wiener cited San Francisco’s vaccine requirements for all urban workers as an example.

“We should look at this more broadly,” Wiener said. “The agency should enforce it and so on. It has nothing to do with legislation.”

“Of course, this will be a tough sale, but it has never stopped people from proposing bills that are not necessarily popular,” Melendez said.

California health officials said the state is ready to respond to the slight increase in cases and hospitalizations, but as of Monday, the state’s health care system is not expected to be under threat.



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