Peru’s Castillo is about to win the presidency after a fierce match | Political News


The Organization of American States Election Observation Mission stated that voting was an “active electoral process” and no “serious irregularities” were found.

Pedro Castillo, the leader of the Peruvian presidential election, is ready to win despite legal disputes Very close votes that sparked tensions in the Andean countries.

“We call on the people of Peru to be vigilant,” Castillo told supporters on Friday night during a legal dispute at the last minute due to tight votes.

According to local media reports, the election authorities had considered changing the rules to allow right-wing rival Fujimori Keiko to challenge the validity of about 200,000 votes. However, under tremendous pressure from the Castillo camp, they finally refused to make changes in the afternoon.

The OAS Election Observation Mission stated that the voting was a “positive electoral process” and no “serious irregularities” were found, which is good for Castillo and bad for Fujimori.

“The investigation team found no serious violations,” said the preliminary report of the team led by the former Paraguayan foreign minister Ruben Ramírez.

Castillo leads Fujimori with only 60,000 votes, with a vote count of 99.6%.

Castillo is an elementary school teacher who aroused the support of poorer rural Peruvians. He expressed concern about the opposition’s plan to cancel votes in underserved areas where he received the majority of support and asked the electoral agency to clarify this One process.

These comments highlight the escalation of tensions in this copper-rich country, which has been in a state of tension since the vote last Sunday.

Castillo has 50.2% of the vote, leading Fujimori by a narrow margin. Unsubstantiated allegations of fraud.

‘Blade Election’

The Peruvian election jury did not comment on media reports that it was considering changing the rules.

Vladimir Seren, the leader of Castillo’s Liberal Peru Party, was even more acute, saying on Twitter that “the people must stand up” to defend the vote.He earlier Claiming that Castillo won the knife-edge election.

The country’s electoral authorities have not yet confirmed the winner, but most observers and left-leaning leaders in some regions, including leaders from Argentina and Bolivia, congratulated Castillo on his victory, which prompted protests from the Peruvian government.

On Friday, supporters of Peru’s presidential candidate Pedro Castillo gathered behind a police roadblock outside the national election jury in the capital Lima [Angela Ponce/Reuters]

Theron wrote: “Several presidents in the world are congratulating Pedro Castillo on his victory. In other words, he has solid international legitimacy.”

Fujimori has not yet acknowledged the election results, and her supporters have called for protests against the election results.

As the daughter of former President Alberto Fujimori who was sentenced to jail, she redoubled her efforts against unconfirmed fraud accusations. Members of her political party stated that they will not give in until all votes are counted and appeals are over. This may still be required. A few days.

Castillo himself did not declare himself a winner.

The election caused serious differences among Peruvians on the class line. High-income citizens supported Fujimori, while many low-income Peruvians supported Castillo, including the country’s main mining area and the world’s second largest copper producer.

Castillo was not a member of the Free Peru Party before running for president. It is not clear whether he will adopt an ultra-left economic stance after he takes power.

In recent days, he has hired Pedro Francke, a moderate left-wing economist, as his adviser.





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