Does High Trucker Turnover Mean Unsafe Roads? Truck Accident Lawyer Discusses

Dallas, 07/17/2017 /SubmitPressRelease123/

Every industry has its ups and downs when it comes to employment. However, the trucking industry has been hit particularly hard by high turnover rates. In fact, driver turnover rates have soared as high as 106 percent in recent years. As one report states, truck driver turnover rates have remained at 90 percent or higher since 2012.

According to the chief economist for the American Trucking Association, “The driver shortage — which we now estimate to be between 35,000 to 40,000 drivers — is getting more pervasive in the truckload sector.”

Reports also state that “high turnover also makes it difficult for fleets to operate efficiently, maximize utilization of tractors and trailers and meet customers’ service expectations.”

A shortage of truck drivers like this also means more dangers could be lurking on the roads.

If trucking companies can’t find drivers that meet their qualifications, there is a real risk that they’ll accept poorly qualified or unqualified candidates in an effort to fill their fleet and keep their businesses afloat. And this is a very real and dangerous practice for drivers.

Unskilled Truck Drivers Are a Major Safety Threat

All too often, unskilled truckers cause serious accidents due to their skill level. As the Chicago Tribune reported, state and federal officials were investigating an incident involving an unskilled trucker — and preparing to send a letter requiring him to retake his driving courses — when he was killed in a truck crash.

Trucking is considered one of the deadliest jobs in the country. According to statistics from the U.S. Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, truck driver fatalities have increased by 11.2 percent over the last five years.

“Increased reliance on trucking to transport goods, including demand for rapid delivery created by the rise of online shopping, is putting more truck drivers on the road. This has contributed to higher incident rates for accidents and driver deaths…”

But if there aren’t enough truck drivers to fill the spots open now, how will the industry fill an expanding pool of job openings? This is a question that troubles many trucking safety experts and drivers alike.

Texas Truck Accident Lawyer Amy Witherite Discusses Trucking Safety

Amy Witherite of 1-800-Truck-Wreck ®, a Texas truck wreck Law Firm states: “Trucking is a dangerous occupation. It can also involve tough working conditions, such as extended periods of time away from home and family. For this reason, many people who might be interested in trucking turn away from trucking as a career path. Increasingly, carrier companies are forced to accept applicants who may not be truly qualified. This is a serious problem for the safety of our roads and for the motorists who use them every day.”   

If you’ve been injured in a commercial truck crash, or you have lost someone you love in a truck accident, compassionate and experienced legal help is available today. Contact a Texas truck accident lawyer right away to discuss your rights and options.

Sources:

  1. http://www.joc.com/trucking-logistics/labor/us-truck-driver-shortage-getting-worse-turnover-figures-show_20150401.html
  2. http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2007-01-01/news/0701010115_1_licenses-drivers-truckers
  3. https://www.trucks.com/2016/12/19/truck-driver-deadliest-job/

Media Contact:
Lucy Tiseo
1-800-Truck-Wreck ® Eberstein Witherite #WeKeepLifeRunning
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source: http://www.1800truckwreck.com/high-trucker-turnover-mean-unsafe-roads-texas-truck-accident-lawyer-discusses.html

Social Media Tags:High Trucker Turnover Accidents, Texas truck accident, Texas truck accident lawyer, Trucking Safety, Unskilled Truck Drivers

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