Anti-smoking efforts marks its presence in state legislation

Legal News for Florida Social Responsibility Attorneys. More states are establishing laws, which protect children from exposure to second-hand smoke.

Florida social responsibility lawyer alerts- Several states have passed laws to protect children from second-hand smoke exposure.

West Palm Beach, FL—Newly implemented laws, which protect children from the harmful effects of second-hand smoke, are seemingly on the rise in several states throughout the nation, according to a report by USA Today. These laws, currently active in approximately six states, allegedly forbid foster parents from smoking when children are nearby. Other laws, such as the one passed in 2008 in Arkansas, prohibit motorists from smoking while driving when children under the age of six or those weighing less than 60 pounds are present, according to information provided by 4029TV.com.

A spokesperson from the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) reportedly noted that Texas joined states including Vermont and Washington, by passing a law that restricts smoking in foster homes on January 1, 2010. Those who fail to adhere to smoke-free laws enforced in Arkansas and Louisiana, which ban smoking in cars where children are present, are being fined $25 for the illegal act, which is regarded as a secondary offense. Those involved in cases regarding custody and visitation privileges are reportedly also being forced to establish a smoke-free environment for children, who may otherwise be exposed to second-hand smoke. A former surgeon general allegedly reported, “Children exposed to secondhand smoke suffer an increased risk of respiratory ailments and sudden infant death syndrome”.

However, many people are seemingly opposed to anti-smoking efforts, such as those expressed in laws that ban smoking in individuals’ homes and cars. A spokesperson for The Smoker’s Club Inc., a smokers right’s group, reportedly compared the smoking bans to the “Salem witch hunt”, allegedly stating, “If we don’t reverse this, they’ll be telling us what we can eat and what we can feed our children”.

Legal News Reporter: Sandra Quinlan- Legal News for Florida Social Responsibility Lawyers.

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